Have you familiarized yourself with OSHA’s Exposure to Risk Pyramid?

OSHA created a risk pyramid to help employers understand the exposure risk their workers may be facing with COVID-19. (Exposure risk may be dependent upon such things as the industry you work in and the need for contact within 6 feet of people known to have, or suspected of having, COVID-19.)

The pyramid explains how to categorize jobs and tasks and includes four levels of risk from lower to very high.

Lower Risk
• Workers in this risk level have limited contact with the public and co-workers, for instance, employees working from home and those who don’t have frequent close contact with customers, co-workers or the public (close contact being within 6 feet).
• An example might be healthcare workers who only provide telemedicine services.

Medium Risk
• Workers in this risk level have frequent or close contact with people who may be infected but who are not known or suspected of having COVID-19.
• Examples include, those who may have contact with the general public, such as schools, densely populated work environments and high-volume retail locations.

High Risk
• Workers in this risk level have a high potential for exposure to people who are known or suspected sources of COVID-19.
• Examples include, healthcare delivery, healthcare support and medical transport.

Very High Risk
• Workers in this risk level have a very high potential for exposure to known or suspected sources of COVID-19 during specific medical, postmortem, or laboratory procedures.
• Examples include, healthcare and morgue workers performing aerosol-generating procedures on or collecting/handling specimens from potentially infectious patients or bodies of people known to have, or suspected of having, COVID-19 at the time of death.

Print out these PDFs
OSHA’s Worker Exposure Risk pyramid
Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19
Guidance on Returning to Work

Control and Prevention Measures

Good practices for exposure risk levels to practice.

• Frequently wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. When soap and running water are unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand rub with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands that are visibly soiled.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
• Practice good respiratory etiquette, including covering coughs and sneezes.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home if sick.
• Recognize personal risk factors. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), certain people, including older adults and those with underlying conditions such as heart or lung disease or diabetes, are at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19.

These prevention measures have been taken from OSHA’s website.

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