The following is a list of the top 10 most frequently cited standards following inspections of worksites by federal OSHA.

This list is published to alert employers to commonly cited standards so you can take steps to find and fix recognized hazards to prevent and/or reduce injuries from occurring.

Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards

October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2017

Fall protection, construction. Falls are among the most common causes of serious work-related injuries and deaths. Learn more about the regulations and what you can do to reduce falls. 29 CFR 1926.501 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Hazard communication standard, general industry. To ensure chemical safety in the workplace, information about the identities and hazards of the chemicals must be available and understandable to all workers. 29 CFR 1910.1200 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Scaffolding, general requirements, construction. Learn more about scaffolding hazards on the job. 29 CFR 1926.451 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Respiratory protection, general industry. According to OSHA, an estimated 5 million workers are required to wear respirators in 1.3 million workplaces throughout the U.S, protecting your workers from harmful dusts, fogs, gases, sprays and more. 29 CFR 1910.134 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), general industry. Energy sources can be hazardous to your workers and includes things such as electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical and thermal. 29 CFR 1910.147 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Ladders, construction. Working on and around stairways and ladders is a major source of injuries and fatalities for constuction workers. 29 CFR 1926.1053 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Powered industrial trucks, general industry. Otherwise known as forklifts or lift trucks, these can be dangerous if not operated correctly or safely. 29 CFR 1910.178 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Machinery and Machine Guarding, general requirements. Moving machine parts can cause serious injuries in the workplace; safeguards are needed to protect workers from injuries such as crushed fingers and amputations. 29 CFR 1910.212 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Fall Protection –Training Requirements. Employers must provide a training program for each employee who might be exposed to fall hazards, which will enable them to recognize the hazards of falling and train them in the procedures to be followed to minimize these hazards. 29 CFR 1926.503 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

Electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry. Electricity is recognized as a serious workplace hazard and OSHA’s standards are designed to protect your workers. 29 CFR 1910.305 [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

For more information, check out OSHA’s Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards page; or, let me know how I can help you.

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